Deputy Dan has no friends

Longtime Friend of the DogS(h)ite® Khal S. notes in comments that the Bernalillo County DA has leveled murder charges against the Albuquerque cops who shot dead a homeless man (as seen on CopCam!). Here’s the Albuquerque Journal story, which may require you to answer a few stupid questions but contains more detail than The New York Times piece referenced above.

This will be one to watch for a number of reasons. First, the killing was captured on video, which law prof David A. Harris says can make it “impossible to deny some of the very basic facts.” And second, the local gendarmes have thus far gone uncharged despite having compiled a body count that even Westhisface would envy.

Elsewhere, we learn about the potential for collateral damage from those cheapo flash-bang grenades the cops are so fond of. The Albuquerque officers used one against the homeless guy, before shooting him with assault rifles and beanbag guns and finally setting a police dog on him; apparently arty and air support were unavailable. Seems a flash-bang can do a lot more than make scary lights and noise. They’ve also “severed hands and fingers, induced heart attacks, burned down homes, and killed pets.”

There was a time, back when your man on the beat carried a .38 Special, that the cops considered themselves under-gunned in comparison with the bad guys. I think it’s fair to say that the pendulum may have swung a tad too far in the other direction. And some of the “bad guys” just aren’t that bad.

• Extra-Credit Reading On Crime and Punishment: Check out The Baltimore Sun story on the drunk bishop. Based on the choice of image I’d say someone manning the website has a particularly dark sense of humor.

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38 Responses to “Deputy Dan has no friends”

  1. khal spencer Says:

    Word

  2. khal spencer Says:

  3. Charley Says:

    Pretty disgusting!

  4. khal spencer Says:

    I wish the cops out here would hammer DWI as hard as they are hammering that Bishop. Out here it is more of a spectator sport.

  5. Pat O'Brien Says:

    I would sure like to know what his previous contacts with law enforcement have been. I think that flash/bang grenade and the dog were the wrong tools used at the wrong time. The SWAT response was unnecessary.

    • Patrick O'Grady Says:

      Yeah, I’d like to know how you move from planning to tase a mentally ill homeless dude to sending 20 heavily armed coppers and a dog after him. Batman would have trouble against those odds. Bats man never had a chance.

    • khal spencer Says:

      Boyd had a history of occasional violence and schizophrenia and had busted a cop’s nose during one arrest. He was not a harmless fella. I do remember that.

      APD had both a Repeat Offender Project, which handled tough and dangerous cases, and a Crisis Intervention (or something like that) squad. They sent in the ROP squad. I suppose that determined tactics. It seems the tactics and training, as well as shaky hiring practices (Sandy had been fired by the State Police) are as much to blame as the individuals, so it would not surprise me if their defense is “We Were Just Following Orders”

      Here is a blurb on Detective Sandy. He sounds like a bit of a cowboy in this report, and a tough cop. His judgement? Hmmmm.

      http://krqe.com/2014/03/19/cop-involved-in-sunday-shooting-had-rocky-past-performance/

      • Larry T. Says:

        Far from a scientific survey but back-in-the-day a fellow high-school troublemaker like yours truly said he wanted to be a cop so he could bust people for doing things like we did. I thought that was odd but later enrolled in a police-science class just to see what the typical “law enforcement mentality” was like. Sadly, most of the wannabee Barney Fife’s in the class had that same attitude. I grew up in Torrance, CA where “DWB” was probable cause for stopping black motorists while nearby LAPD Chief Daryl Gates used an ex-military tank with a big battering ram mounted on the turret to knock down the doors of dope dealers….or not… as seemed to be the case more than a few times. The nasty joke was LAPD would fire off a couple of rounds, then announce “Police! Stop or we’ll shoot!” It seems this crap will never stop.

    • Pat O'Brien Says:

      Thanks Khal. The so called “journalists” should have asked my question at the DA’s press conference. The writer should have put it in the article even if that information had appeared in print before. As Patrick said, the escalation of force wasn’t just unnecessary, it was bat shit crazy. The guy never had a chance.

      • khal spencer Says:

        Given they knew this guy (and that he was batshit crazy), it seems they handled it in a way to guarantee failure–or a shooting. Maybe that’s why they are being charged.

        This is not the first time that APD has responded to a mentally ill person with an Rx of high speed lead poisoning. Its troubling. Then again, a few years back a mentally ill person gunned down two APD cops in cold blood in an ambush. What a world.

      • hurben Says:

        I’m sort of an outsider looking in here, but weren’t Tasers & Pepper spray an option?

      • Pat O'Brien Says:

        You are right hurben, a Taser would have ended this particular situation with no injury to anyone.

  6. Pat O'Brien Says:

    You are right. What a world indeed. The headlines today verify it.

    Well other Mad Dog aficionados, this should cheer you up. My wife started watching Downton Abbey this year for the first time. So, of course, I went down and bought a used Blu-ray of the first four seasons. We, and I did say we, watched the first two seasons in the last week, including a four hour marathon on Sunday. So there, I have admitted it. I watched a serial soap opera for crying out loud. A great one yes, but a soap! I have lost my manhood as sure as Duffy and the Mighty Boo. Damn the British, ITC, PBS, and their classy productions. Let the replies begin.

  7. Larry T. Says:

    Back in the “Protect & Serve” category there’s this
    http://velonews.competitor.com/2015/01/news/road/notes-scrum-thing-love-can-kill_358177
    If this were me and I could move my arms I would have taken a swing at a cop trying to write ME a ticket after some moron runs me down from behind! WTF? The businesses who profit from cycling activity in Colorado ought to be tearing their highway patrol chief a new one, no? Same shit happened when my wife was knocked off by some a-hole towing a boat in SoCal….no ticket for her but first words out of the CHP guy’s mouth was “I wouldn’t ride a bicycle on this road.” Who are these people protecting and serving?

    • khal spencer Says:

      When it comes to bike law, there are clueless cops and prejudiced cops everywhere. That ticket should have been contested. So much for Boulder being a bicycle friendly community.

    • JD Dallager Says:

      Wow! Maybe incidents like that are the reason I mainly do mountain biking now. There, the only person trying to kill me is me, myself, and I.

  8. Pat O'Brien Says:

    Briefly going back to the Austin Shitty Limits post, I just received an E mail from Walz Caps with an offer. If I bought an Amy Dombroski Fund cap they would throw in an Austin CX cap for free. Guess they didn’t sell as many of those as they thought they would. Maybe all the customers left town, heh?

  9. Steve O Says:

    After Ferguson, 538.com ran a piece on FBI statistics. Bottom line, we have no freaking idea how many folks are killed or even just shot by cops because records are so sketchy.

  10. Steve O Says:

    You don’t hear about it so much stateside, but when you’re stationed overseas, about once a year or so a soldier commits a heinous crime, and the local folks get in an uproar, portraying all soldiers in the same light.

    If you look at it for me numbers perspective, it seems to be a non-issue. If you have 50,000 soldiers stationed in another country, at least one of them is going to be a shithead. Just not much you can do about that.

    Lots of discussion about how our cops are militarized and over armed these days. And cops, like soldiers, are pretty similar: the bottom of the food chain, tip of the spear, lowest level of the organization but up close and personal with the populace.

    If somebody has numbers, you can persuade me otherwise, but right now, I find it hard to believe that it’s just a coincidence that a whole bunch of overly aggressive, chip on their shoulder, itching to pull the trigger types all make it through the police academy. It seems more likely that the problem is not in the personnel but in the way they are deployed.

    I’ve said this 1000 times with respect to simple traffic tickets: it makes no sense to have a $65k/ year patrolman in a $40k cruiser with $12k in computer/commo gear writing $100 tickets.

    But you can make the same claim about the whole gestalt. You can break down crime by frequency of incident, dollars of damage incurred, impact on the economy, etc. and then you can break down how we deploy our lawn enforcement personnel. And I guarantee you, there is not an alignment between the two that would make sense to anyone other than a bean counter.

    How are cops are deployed based on historical inertia. That’s the way they did it last year, that’s the way they’ll do it next year. Has nothing to do with where they are actually needed.

    The question of the day is why these cops went all berserker on this homeless guy. But stepping back from the specifics of this case, why are we deploying them the way they are across the board?

  11. Steve O Says:

    There’s something wrong with the way we discuss and debate these cases. The debate turns into a discussion of whether the cops should’ve been there in the first place, instead of whether killing the guy was okay. It’s like, we except a certain number of people are going to get killed anyway.

    I remember during the Rodney King case, we are the one cop hit him in the head 53 times. The case boils down to, was the first hit justified, instead of, was the 53rd hit justified? I never understood the logic there.

  12. Dale Says:

    Not an egregious case like the NM shooting of the mentally ill homeless man – but how stupid does a cop (two cops actually) have to be to not realize that he is dealing with a person with Down Syndrome?
    http://gawker.com/5985166/man-with-down-syndrom-dies-while-in-police-custody-medical-examiner-rules-death-a-homicide

    • Dale Says:

      I’m now replying to my own comment. If you follow the link, scroll down to a comment by EricaLimer. It is the coldest, most disgusting take on a tragedy that I can recall.

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